Why Animated TV And Film Is Thriving During The Pandemic : 1A While live-action movies and television crews have slowed or stopped their work during the pandemic, America's TV and film animators have been busy as they work from home.

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Why Animated TV And Film Is Thriving During The Pandemic

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Why Animated TV And Film Is Thriving During The Pandemic

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Why Animated TV And Film Is Thriving During The Pandemic

Why Animated TV And Film Is Thriving During The Pandemic

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/944885217/950475088" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tawny Newsome plays Ensign Beckett Mariner on the CBS All Access series "Star Trek: Lower Decks." Best Possible Screen Grab CBS 2020 CBS Interactive, Inc. hide caption

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Best Possible Screen Grab CBS 2020 CBS Interactive, Inc.

Tawny Newsome plays Ensign Beckett Mariner on the CBS All Access series "Star Trek: Lower Decks."

Best Possible Screen Grab CBS 2020 CBS Interactive, Inc.

It's no surprise that the average American household spent more time streaming TV and movies in 2020 than in 2019.

But what may come as a surprise is how much of that time is now devoted to animation. Streaming services have been investing in animated TV and movies for years. As animators can continue their work from home, the demand for their work has grown.

Joel Crawford, Ayo Edebiri, and Katie Krentz joined us to talk about why the medium is so popular, why animation means to them and their favorite pieces of animated content from 2020.

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