Planet Money learns about market forces at Christmas tree auctions : Planet Money Nick and Robert head to the world's largest Christmas tree auction with $1,000 and a truck. And get schooled in the tree market. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.
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We Buy A Lot Of Christmas Trees

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We Buy A Lot Of Christmas Trees

We Buy A Lot Of Christmas Trees

We Buy A Lot Of Christmas Trees

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Nick Fountain hawks a Frasier Fir in Brooklyn. Robert Smith/NPR hide caption

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Robert Smith/NPR

Nick Fountain hawks a Frasier Fir in Brooklyn.

Robert Smith/NPR

'Tis the season for Americans to head out in droves and bring home a freshly-cut Christmas tree. But decorative evergreens don't just magically show up on corner lots, waiting to find a home in your living room. There are a bunch of fascinating steps that determine exactly how many Christmas trees get sold, and how expensive they are.

Today on the show, we visit the world's largest auction of Christmas trees — and then see how much green New Yorkers are willing to throw down for some greenery. It's a story where snow-dusted Yuletide dreams meet the hard reality of supply and demand. We've got market theory, a thousand dollars in cash, and a "decent sized truck"... anything could happen.

Music: "Our Holiday Romance," "Bells and Beats," and Leo Sidran's "The Story of the Tree."

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