Restaurant Owners Left Wondering If Help Is Coming : Consider This from NPR An emerging coronavirus relief package may not do enough to help restaurants hobbled by the pandemic, many of which have struggled to make ends meet all year — with 100,000 restaurants closed on a permanent or long-term basis, according to a survey from the National Restaurant Association.

Andrew Genung, the writer behind the restaurant industry newsletter Family Meal, explains why so many restaurants did not get enough help in the first round of relief passed by Congress early in the pandemic.

Nya Marshall, owner of Ivy Kitchen and Cocktails in Detroit, describes the adjustments necessary to run her restaurant this year.

And at least one restaurant-adjacent business is doing well: Auction Factory, which repairs and sells liquidated restaurant equipment. Cleveland-based owner Russell Cross tells NPR his warehouse is full of equipment from shuttered restaurants.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
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With 100,000 Restaurants Already Closed, Owners Left Wondering If Help Is Coming

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With 100,000 Restaurants Already Closed, Owners Left Wondering If Help Is Coming

With 100,000 Restaurants Already Closed, Owners Left Wondering If Help Is Coming

With 100,000 Restaurants Already Closed, Owners Left Wondering If Help Is Coming

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/946325964/947737275" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A pedestrian walks past a sign reading "Take Out And Delivery Only" on the door of a restaurant in the Hells Kitchen neighborhood of Manhattan on Thursday. Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A pedestrian walks past a sign reading "Take Out And Delivery Only" on the door of a restaurant in the Hells Kitchen neighborhood of Manhattan on Thursday.

Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images

An emerging coronavirus relief package may not do enough to help restaurants hobbled by the pandemic, many of which have struggled to make ends meet all year — with 100,000 restaurants closed on a permanent or long-term basis, according to a survey from the National Restaurant Association.

Andrew Genung, the writer behind the restaurant industry newsletter Family Meal, explains why so many restaurants did not get enough help in the first round of relief passed by Congress early in the pandemic.

Nya Marshall, owner of Ivy Kitchen and Cocktails in Detroit, describes the adjustments necessary to run her restaurant this year.

And at least one restaurant-adjacent business is doing well: Auction Factory, which repairs and sells liquidated restaurant equipment. Cleveland-based owner Russell Cross tells NPR his warehouse is full of equipment from shuttered restaurants.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brianna Scott, Lee Hale, Art Silverman and Brent Baughman. It was edited by Sami Yenigun and Patrick Jarenwattananon with help from Wynne Davis. Engineering help from Alex Drewenskus. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.

Correction Dec. 22, 2020

A previous version of the summary misspelled Andrew Genung's last name as Gerung.