Federal Executions And The Trump Administration : 1A Before President Donald Trump took office, there hadn't been a federal execution in 17 years. Now, the Trump administration is on track to complete the most federal executions in modern history.

We talked about it and answered your questions.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.
NPR logo

Federal Executions And The Trump Administration

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/946363592/947240387" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Federal Executions And The Trump Administration

1A

Federal Executions And The Trump Administration

Federal Executions And The Trump Administration

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/946363592/947240387" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

An anti-death penalty activist demonstrates in front of the U.S. Justice Department's Robert F. Kennedy Building in Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla/Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

An anti-death penalty activist demonstrates in front of the U.S. Justice Department's Robert F. Kennedy Building in Washington, DC.

Chip Somodevilla/Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Ten federal executions have happened in 2020. Three more are scheduled before the end of next month.

The last time the government executed that many people was in 1896. The Trump administration is now scheduled to complete the most federal executions in modern history.

In 2019, Attorney General Bill Barr announced the resumption of federal executions after a 16-year hiatus. The executions will continue until President-elect Joe Biden takes office.

Why is the Justice Department pushing through these executions? Does it align with public opinion? And are states using capital punishment in the same way?

Liliana Segura, Robert Dunham, and Sister Helen Prejean joined us to talk about those questions and much more.

Like what you hear? Find more of our programs on our website.