Paleontologists Discover Southern Hemisphere's 1st Dinosaur With Feathers The two legged creature lived an estimated 110 million years ago. It was a small animal with a fuzzy hair-like mane and rod-like features protruding out of its shoulders, two on each side.
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Paleontologists Discover Southern Hemisphere's 1st Dinosaur With Feathers

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Paleontologists Discover Southern Hemisphere's 1st Dinosaur With Feathers

Paleontologists Discover Southern Hemisphere's 1st Dinosaur With Feathers

Paleontologists Discover Southern Hemisphere's 1st Dinosaur With Feathers

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/947027239/947027240" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The two legged creature lived an estimated 110 million years ago. It was a small animal with a fuzzy hair-like mane and rod-like features protruding out of its shoulders, two on each side.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Paleontologists have discovered a new dinosaur they're calling a little showoff. The two-legged creature lived an estimated 110 million years ago. Imagine this - a small animal with a fuzzy, hairlike mane and these long, thin ribbons protruding out of its shoulders, two on each side. It's the first dinosaur with feathers ever discovered in the southern hemisphere. Honestly, it looks like a raccoon-chicken hybrid, but its real name means lord of the spear, which is way cooler. It's MORNING EDITION.

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