How arts workers are coping in the pandemic. : The Indicator from Planet Money Morgan Gould is a playwright who talked with us in April about the cancellation of her play. She describes what life has been like for people who work in the arts during the pandemic. | Support The Indicator here.
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The State Of The Arts

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The State Of The Arts

The State Of The Arts

The State Of The Arts

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Hindustan Times/Hindustan Times via Getty Images
(Photo by Samir Jana/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
Hindustan Times/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Morgan Gould is a playwright based in New York City. Earlier this year, she had a breakthrough in her career: her play, Nicole Clark Had A Baby was accepted into a festival.

Shortly after, however, it was cancelled for a reason that's become all too familiar to people who work in the arts: the coronavirus.

Morgan talked to us about the cancellation of her play in April. Today we hear from her about how she and other arts workers have dealt with the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic.

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