Teacher Gets Students' Attention With Fart Noise Prank Emma Ginder was teaching on Zoom when her class heard what sounded like her passing gas. She admitted playing a fart sound to lighten the mood, apologizing for having the maturity of a young boy.
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Teacher Gets Students' Attention With Fart Noise Prank

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Teacher Gets Students' Attention With Fart Noise Prank

Teacher Gets Students' Attention With Fart Noise Prank

Teacher Gets Students' Attention With Fart Noise Prank

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/949503080/949503081" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Emma Ginder was teaching on Zoom when her class heard what sounded like her passing gas. She admitted playing a fart sound to lighten the mood, apologizing for having the maturity of a young boy.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Emma Ginder was teaching on Zoom when her class heard her pass something on.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED CHILD #1: (Laughter) What was that?

UNIDENTIFIED CHILD #2: I think she farted (laughter).

GREENE: Kids lost it when they heard the fart. They were sure it was their teacher.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

EMMA GINDER: Whoever it was might be a little embarrassed, so let's stop.

UNIDENTIFIED CHILD #3: I still blame you.

GREENE: The teacher later admitted to playing a fake fart sound to lighten the mood. She said, I apologize for having the maturity of an 8-year-old boy.

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