How COVID-19 Could Change Science Forever : Short Wave 2020 was a year like no other, especially for science. The pandemic has caused massive shifts in scientific research – how it's being done, what's being focused on, and who's doing it. Ed Yong of The Atlantic explains some of the ways, both good and bad, that COVID-19 has changed science.

Read Ed's full reporting on these changes here.
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How COVID-19 Has Changed Science

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How COVID-19 Has Changed Science

How COVID-19 Has Changed Science

How COVID-19 Has Changed Science

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Health workers work in a lab at the Kawasaki City Institute for Public Health at the Kawasaki Innovation Gateway (KING) Skyfront in Kawasaki, Japan. David Mareui/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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David Mareui/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Health workers work in a lab at the Kawasaki City Institute for Public Health at the Kawasaki Innovation Gateway (KING) Skyfront in Kawasaki, Japan.

David Mareui/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

2020 was a year like no other, especially for science. The pandemic has caused massive shifts in scientific research – how it's being done, what's being focused on, and who's doing it. Ed Yong of The Atlantic explains some of the ways, both good and bad, that COVID-19 has changed science.

Read Ed's full reporting on these changes here.

As always, you can email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was edited by Viet Le, and fact-checked by Ariela Zebede.