How people are starting businesses in a pandemic : The Indicator from Planet Money The coronavirus has been responsible for massive business closures...but at the same time, Americans are starting businesses at the fastest rate in more than a decade.
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Entrepreneurship On The Rise

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Entrepreneurship On The Rise

Entrepreneurship On The Rise

Entrepreneurship On The Rise

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/955697672/955787827" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Robert Alexander/Getty Images
BANDON, OREGON - JUNE 14, 2019: A mural painted on the side of a Bandon, Oregon, seafood restaurant and market advertises crabs on the restaurant menu. (Photo by Robert Alexander/Getty Images)
Robert Alexander/Getty Images

The coronavirus has been responsible for massive business closures, job losses, and deepening inequality.

But at the same time, another trend has slowly unfolded: Americans are starting businesses at the fastest rate in more than a decade. By September of 2020, applications for the employer identification numbers (EIN) had surpassed 3.2 million for the year, up more than 500,000 compared to the year before.

To get a better understanding of how this is possible, we talked to RaeShawn and LaShone Middleton, two business owners from Laurel, Maryland.

After they lost their jobs in March, they decided to start their own business. We talk to them about their journey into the world of entrepreneurship in the age of the coronavirus.

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