Breaking down the first Beige Book of 2021. : The Indicator from Planet Money The economy might be down, but Americans are buying a lot of stuff right now. Today on the show, we break it down and pick our favorite economic story from the Beige Book.
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The Beigies: Traffic Jam At The Ports

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The Beigies: Traffic Jam At The Ports

The Beigies: Traffic Jam At The Ports

The Beigies: Traffic Jam At The Ports

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/957256939/957452614" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Christopher Polk/Getty Images
HOLLYWOOD, CA - FEBRUARY 27: A man is seen in silhouette onstage during rehearsals for the 88th Annual Academy Awards at Dolby Theatre on February 27, 2016 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images)
Christopher Polk/Getty Images

Eight times a year, the Federal Reserve publishes the Beige Book, a collection of stories that provide insight into the state economy. Unlike most Fed publications, the Beige Book isn't filled with dense, wonky economic analysis.

No, the Beige Book is a narrative approach to understanding the economy.

When the Beige Book drops, we like to highlight our favorite stories. We also award the most coveted honor The Indicator Editorial Board has to offer: The Beigie.

Can the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia repeat its 2018 win? Could The Beigie be on its way to San Francisco? Some say Dallas is a dark horse this year! And can anybody dethrone the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis?

Stacey and Paddy roll out the red carpet and hand out the first Beigie of 2021.

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