How President Biden Plans Do Undo Trump's Immigration Policy : Consider This from NPR President Biden followed through on a day-one promise to send a massive immigration reform bill to Congress. Now the hard part: passing that bill into law.

Muzaffar Chishti of New York University's Migration Policy Institute explains the president's plans — and the signal they send to other countries around the world.

Biden is also pursuing big changes in how the U.S. admits refugees. Corine Dehabey, an Ohio-based director of the refugee settlement organization Us Together, says families who've been separated for years are looking forward to reuniting.

Follow more of NPR's immigration coverage from Southwest correspondent John Burnett.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
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How President Biden's Immigration Plan Would Undo Trump's Signature Policies

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How President Biden's Immigration Plan Would Undo Trump's Signature Policies

How President Biden's Immigration Plan Would Undo Trump's Signature Policies

How President Biden's Immigration Plan Would Undo Trump's Signature Policies

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/957426578/959363830" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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President Biden prepares to sign a series of executive orders in the Oval Office just hours after his inauguration on Wednesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden prepares to sign a series of executive orders in the Oval Office just hours after his inauguration on Wednesday.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden followed through on a day-one promise to send a massive immigration reform bill to Congress. Now the hard part: passing that bill into law.

Muzaffar Chishti of New York University's Migration Policy Institute explains the president's plans — and the signal they send to other countries around the world.

Biden is also pursuing big changes in how the U.S. admits refugees. Corine Dehabey, an Ohio-based director of the refugee settlement organization Us Together, says families who've been separated for years are looking forward to reuniting.

Follow more of NPR's immigration coverage from Southwest correspondent John Burnett.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Connor Donevan, Brianna Scott, Lee Hale and Brent Baughman. It was edited by Sami Yenigun with help from Laura Smitherman and Wynne Davis. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.