Magic Trick Unveiled 100 Years Ago Still Intrigues Audiences A Century ago, English magician P.T. Selbit debuted a trick in London: He sawed a woman in half. The illusion continues to be popular with audiences, and magicians are always looking for volunteers.
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Magic Trick Unveiled 100 Years Ago Still Intrigues Audiences

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Magic Trick Unveiled 100 Years Ago Still Intrigues Audiences

Magic Trick Unveiled 100 Years Ago Still Intrigues Audiences

Magic Trick Unveiled 100 Years Ago Still Intrigues Audiences

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/957982001/957982002" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Century ago, English magician P.T. Selbit debuted a trick in London: He sawed a woman in half. The illusion continues to be popular with audiences, and magicians are always looking for volunteers.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. One hundred years ago this weekend, magician P.T. Selbit debuted a trick in London. He asked a woman to climb in a box, and he sawed her in half. It's one of the most compelling tricks ever seen onstage. It's not performed on an object but on a person who seems in danger. Selbit's innovation was passed down through the generations, and the illusion has now lasted a century - that is, if it is an illusion. It's MORNING EDITION.

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