Eerie Theories: The Psychology Behind Conspiracy : 1A Donald Trump did not win the presidential election last November. Why do so many people believe he did? We explore the psychology associated with conspiracy theories.

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Eerie Theories: The Psychology Behind Conspiracy

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Eerie Theories: The Psychology Behind Conspiracy

1A

Eerie Theories: The Psychology Behind Conspiracy

Eerie Theories: The Psychology Behind Conspiracy

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/958121374/958137761" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A person wearing a QAnon sweatshirt stands off against US Capitol police officers as officials tried to stop insurrectionists supporting President Donald Trump from entering the U.S. Capitol. SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

A person wearing a QAnon sweatshirt stands off against US Capitol police officers as officials tried to stop insurrectionists supporting President Donald Trump from entering the U.S. Capitol.

SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

The majority of Americans know that Joe Biden won the 2020 presidential election.

But, the Pew Research Center recently found that 64 percent of Republicans believe — incorrectly — that Donald Trump won instead.

There is no evidence to support that claim. Election results have been upheld again and again by election officials across the country. So why do so many people still believe it?

Asheley Landrum and Joan Donovan talked with us about conspiracy theories and what draws so many Americans to them.

We also speak to a listener who says he used to be consumed by conspiracy theories after 9/11 and got himself out of it. Now, he's struggling with his parents and their belief in conspiracy theories. He asked us to withold his name to protect his privacy.

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