Extremism After Insurrection; Amber Ruffin & 'Crazy Stories About Racism' : It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders How will the response to far-right extremism compare to the response after 9/11? Sam talks to Hannah Allam, NPR national security correspondent, about the security and civil liberties debate over taking a "war on terror" mindset to today's far-right threat. Also, Sam chats with sisters Amber Ruffin and Lacey Lamar, co-authors of the book You'll Never Believe What Happened to Lacey, about their inexplicable, sometimes hilarious, but always horrifying stories of everyday racism.

You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.
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Lessons from 9/11 for Today's Extremism; Plus 'Crazy Stories About Racism'

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Lessons from 9/11 for Today's Extremism; Plus 'Crazy Stories About Racism'

Lessons from 9/11 for Today's Extremism; Plus 'Crazy Stories About Racism'

Lessons from 9/11 for Today's Extremism; Plus 'Crazy Stories About Racism'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/959163535/959731369" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Riot fencing and razor wire reinforce the security zone on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2021, before President-elect Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president on Wednesday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Riot fencing and razor wire reinforce the security zone on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2021, before President-elect Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president on Wednesday.

J. Scott Applewhite/AP

How will the response to far-right extremism compare to the response after 9/11? Sam talks to Hannah Allam, NPR national security correspondent, about the security and civil liberties debate over taking a "war on terror" mindset to today's far-right threat.

Also, Sam chats with sisters Amber Ruffin and Lacey Lamar, co-authors of the book You'll Never Believe What Happened to Lacey, about their inexplicable, sometimes hilarious, but always horrifying stories of everyday racism.

This episode of 'It's Been a Minute' was produced by Jinae West, Anjuli Sastry and Andrea Gutierrez. Our intern is Liam McBain. Our editor is Jordana Hochman. Our director of programming is Steve Nelson. You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.