Knife Wielding Squirrel Shocks Toronto Woman Andrea Diamond has seen lots of squirrels in her backyard, but when she saw one wielding a blue paring knife, she had to do a double-take.
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Knife Wielding Squirrel Shocks Toronto Woman

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Knife Wielding Squirrel Shocks Toronto Woman

Knife Wielding Squirrel Shocks Toronto Woman

Knife Wielding Squirrel Shocks Toronto Woman

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/959529666/959529667" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Andrea Diamond has seen lots of squirrels in her backyard, but when she saw one wielding a blue paring knife, she had to do a double-take.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Noel King. Andrea Diamond of Toronto is used to having squirrels in her backyard, but she did a double take recently when she saw one holding something blue. She looked closer. The squirrel was twirling a paring knife in its front paws. Eventually, it ran away unhurt, and she noticed it had also gotten into some hand sanitizer she'd left out. They're trying to be COVID conscientious, I guess, she said. It's MORNING EDITION.

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