Veteran Senate Staffer Says Democrats Should Nuke The Filibuster : Consider This from NPR Adam Jentleson knows firsthand how powerful a tool the filibuster can be — and what's possible without it. He was deputy chief of staff to former Nevada Sen. Harry Reid, who was majority leader in 2013 when Democrats exercised "the nuclear option," eliminating the filibuster for presidential appointees.

Now, Jentleson and a growing number of Democrats argue Senate leaders should eliminate the filibuster for legislation, which would enable Democrats to pass major legislation with a simple Senate majority, instead of the current 60-vote threshold. Jentleson lays out his argument in a recent book, Kill Switch: The Rise of the Modern Senate and the Crippling of American Democracy.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
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'We Have To Stop Rewarding Obstruction:' Will Democrats Nuke The Filibuster?

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'We Have To Stop Rewarding Obstruction:' Will Democrats Nuke The Filibuster?

'We Have To Stop Rewarding Obstruction:' Will Democrats Nuke The Filibuster?

'We Have To Stop Rewarding Obstruction:' Will Democrats Nuke The Filibuster?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/959667430/960493345" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, seen here at the U.S. Capitol on Thursday, says Democrats don't intend to take nuking the filibuster off the table. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, seen here at the U.S. Capitol on Thursday, says Democrats don't intend to take nuking the filibuster off the table.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Adam Jentleson knows firsthand how powerful a tool the filibuster can be — and what's possible without it. He was deputy chief of staff to former Nevada Sen. Harry Reid, who was majority leader in 2013 when Democrats exercised "the nuclear option," eliminating the filibuster for presidential appointees.

Now, Jentleson and a growing number of Democrats argue Senate leaders should eliminate the filibuster for legislation, which would enable Democrats to pass major legislation with a simple Senate majority, instead of the current 60-vote threshold. Jentleson lays out his argument in a recent book, Kill Switch: The Rise of the Modern Senate and the Crippling of American Democracy.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brianna Scott and Brent Baughman. It was edited by Lee Hale with help from Deirdre Walsh and Wynne Davis. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.