Panel Questions All the president's bikes.
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Panel Questions

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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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All the president's bikes.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, it is time for you to answer some questions about the week's news. Josh, President Biden is facing a security concern already. Experts say his beloved what may make the White House vulnerable to hackers?

JOSH GONDELMAN: Oh, I know this. And it's relevant to our previous listener call-in - his Peloton.

SAGAL: Yes, his...

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: ...Peloton bicycle.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE SOUND EFFECT)

SAGAL: I was surprised he has one because we didn't know Peloton made a penny-farthing model.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Peloton bikes are, of course, linked via the Internet so that users can enjoy virtual classes and even competition with other douchebags all over the world. And some worry that if President Biden brings his Peloton to the White House, hackers could use it to get into the White House system. It seems, though, that the best security is just to leave it be. Some Russian hacks in and is confronted with a sweaty 78-year-old torso wearing a sleeveless kiss me, I'm Irish T-shirt. Nyet. Nyet.

(LAUGHTER)

MO ROCCA: I don't understand. Is it the - is the concern - I don't have a Peloton, so is the concern that - is it information or just actually seeing Biden?

SAGAL: Well, that's not - I don't think they're worried that, like, the Russians or the Chinese or whomever might download President Biden's exercise data. I don't think that's a state secret. But in order to work, a Peloton has to get on Wi-Fi to get to the Internet.

ROCCA: Oh, got it.

SAGAL: So if you can get into the Peloton, then you have a way into the Wi-Fi Internet. And then you can download all kinds of state secrets.

HELEN HONG: Oh, so it's not about them being, like, oh, a little high blood pressure today.

SAGAL: No.

ROCCA: It's John Grisham's "The Peloton Brief."

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: But the real reason to take away Joe Biden's Peloton is if you know any Peloton people, they cannot stop talking about it.

HONG: It's so true. Gosh.

GONDELMAN: I'm - look. Listen because when I'm 78, my exercise regimen is going to be whatever I happen to be doing that day.

(LAUGHTER)

GONDELMAN: I'm not buying - I'm not learning new electronics, period, at 78 but certainly not for exercise.

(SOUNDBITE OF OFF BASS BRASS' "BICYCLE RACE")

SAGAL: Coming up, our panelists salvage what is left of their reputations in our Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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