Myanmar Coup Explained: How Will President Biden Respond? : Consider This from NPR For months, Myanmar's military party has claimed — without evidence — that its poor performance in the country's November parliamentary elections was the result of voter fraud. This week, when the new Parliament was scheduled to convene, the military launched a coup, detaining top civilian officials including State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi.

Michael Sullivan reports from Thailand on the uncertainty over what happens next. Washington Post columnist Fareed Zakaria explains why the coup represents a test for the Biden administration. Zakaria is the author of Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
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Myanmar Explained: How A Coup Followed Unproven Allegations Of Voter Fraud

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Myanmar Explained: How A Coup Followed Unproven Allegations Of Voter Fraud

Myanmar Explained: How A Coup Followed Unproven Allegations Of Voter Fraud

Myanmar Explained: How A Coup Followed Unproven Allegations Of Voter Fraud

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/962235813/963389083" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A military armored vehicle is seen along a street in Myitkyina, Kachin State on Tuesday as Myanmar's generals appeared in firm control a day after seizing power in a coup. STR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP via Getty Images

A military armored vehicle is seen along a street in Myitkyina, Kachin State on Tuesday as Myanmar's generals appeared in firm control a day after seizing power in a coup.

STR/AFP via Getty Images

For months, Myanmar's military party has claimed — without evidence — that its poor performance in the country's November parliamentary elections was the result of voter fraud. This week, when the new Parliament was scheduled to convene, the military launched a coup, detaining top civilian officials including State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi.

Michael Sullivan reports from Thailand on the uncertainty over what happens next. Washington Post columnist Fareed Zakaria explains why the coup represents a test for the Biden administration. Zakaria is the author of Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brianna Scott, Lee Hale and Brent Baughman. It was edited by Sami Yenigun with help from Nishant Dahiya and Wynne Davis. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.