New York Town Backs Down On Fight Against Toilet Gardens It started as a protest in 2004, Hank Robar placed several toilets filled with fake flowers on his property in Potsdam. Officials ordered him to remove them. The case went to federal court.
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New York Town Backs Down On Fight Against Toilet Gardens

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New York Town Backs Down On Fight Against Toilet Gardens

New York Town Backs Down On Fight Against Toilet Gardens

New York Town Backs Down On Fight Against Toilet Gardens

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/963536967/963536968" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

It started as a protest in 2004, Hank Robar placed several toilets filled with fake flowers on his property in Potsdam. Officials ordered him to remove them. The case went to federal court.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. The First Amendment is in the toilet or, rather, it protects Hank Robar, who placed several toilets filled with flowers on his property in Potsdam, N.Y. His toilet gardens started as a protest years ago, and he now calls it art. Last year, the village ordered him to remove it.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

HANK ROBAR: I hired a lawyer, and I figured I'd let the law takes its own way.

INSKEEP: WWNY reports the case went to federal court, and the village backed down. So Robar is free for now to keep his property full of flushers. It's MORNING EDITION.

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