Scientists Say Eavesdropping Is A Trait Shared By Monkeys, Humans Researchers at the University of Zurich discovered that marmosets are capable of understanding conversations between other monkeys, and of judging whether they want to interact with those monkeys.

Scientists Say Eavesdropping Is A Trait Shared By Monkeys, Humans

Scientists Say Eavesdropping Is A Trait Shared By Monkeys, Humans

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Researchers at the University of Zurich discovered that marmosets are capable of understanding conversations between other monkeys, and of judging whether they want to interact with those monkeys.

SACHA PFEIFFER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Sacha Pfeiffer with news that scientists have found another common trait shared by monkeys and humans - eavesdropping. Researchers at the University of Zurich discovered that marmosets are capable of understanding conversations between other monkeys and of judging whether they want to interact with those monkeys. Now they just need to perfect looking away quickly when the other monkeys notice they're listening. It's MORNING EDITION.

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