Scientists Discover What May Be World's Smallest Reptile The world of tiny animals has just gotten even smaller. A new species of chameleon, which is about the size of a sunflower seed, has been found in Madagascar.
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Scientists Discover What May Be World's Smallest Reptile

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Scientists Discover What May Be World's Smallest Reptile

Scientists Discover What May Be World's Smallest Reptile

Scientists Discover What May Be World's Smallest Reptile

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/966199608/966199609" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The world of tiny animals has just gotten even smaller. A new species of chameleon, which is about the size of a sunflower seed, has been found in Madagascar.

SACHA PFEIFFER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Sacha Pfeiffer. The world of tiny animals has just gotten even smaller. Scientists discovered a new species of chameleon recently. It's from Madagascar, and it's likely the smallest reptile on the planet - about the size of a sunflower seed. Scientists say it's so small that it subsists on a diet of even tinier insects, like mites, which begs the question - would you rather fight 100 nano-chameleons or one really large one?

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