Valentine's Day Roses Surge in Price Amid Covid Disruptions : The Indicator from Planet Money The Covid-19 lockdown sent the flower market into free fall, but recently, flower prices have been picking up again. Who are the culprits behind this? Our old friends supply and demand, of course!
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Days Of COVID And Roses

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Days Of COVID And Roses

Days Of COVID And Roses

Days Of COVID And Roses

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/967509137/967539546" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP via Getty Images
(Photo by KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP via Getty Images)
KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP via Getty Images

Valentine's Day: the international day of romance, chocolates, "where is this going" conversations, and impossible restaurant reservations. Except Valentine's Day 2021 is going to be a little different than usual. With many places still in lockdown and economies reeling from the effects of the pandemic, a lot of businesses have been hit hard.

With trade networks spanning continents and a business model reliant on big events like weddings, the flower industry was hit especially hard during 2020. Prices plummeted in March, and The Netherlands' flower auction houses began curtailing supply from its growers. But then, over the summer, prices started picking up again are now even higher than before the pandemic! What's been going on?

We talk to Michel van Schie of Royal FloraHolland to explain these price shifts in this tumultuous year for the flower industry.

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