A Shot In The Dark : Code Switch As the rollout of coronavirus vaccines unfolds, one big challenge for public health officials has been the skepticism many Black people have toward the vaccine. One notorious medical study — the Tuskegee experiment — has been cited as a reason. But should it be?
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A Shot In The Dark

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A Shot In The Dark

A Shot In The Dark

A Shot In The Dark

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As the rollout of coronavirus vaccines unfolds, one big challenge for public health officials has been the skepticism many Black people have toward the vaccine. One notorious medical study — the Tuskegee experiment — has been cited as a reason. But should it be?

Rev. Baums takes COVID Vaccine administered by nurse Anita Joy at the Zion AME Syracuse. Cherilyn Beckles for NPR hide caption

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Cherilyn Beckles for NPR

Rev. Baums takes COVID Vaccine administered by nurse Anita Joy at the Zion AME Syracuse.

Cherilyn Beckles for NPR

Reverend Roosevelt Baums portrait Cherilyn Beckles for NPR hide caption

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Cherilyn Beckles for NPR

Reverend Roosevelt Baums portrait

Cherilyn Beckles for NPR

A patient gets blood drawnas part of the Tuskegee syphilis study in 1932. National Archives hide caption

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National Archives

A patient gets blood drawnas part of the Tuskegee syphilis study in 1932.

National Archives

Tuskegee study subjects talking with study coordinator, Nurse Eunice Rivers, c.1970. National Archives hide caption

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National Archives