Thousands of superheroes exist in the public domain : Planet Money Marvel was not interested in selling us Doorman. But there is another way to jumpstart our superhero empire.| Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.
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We Buy A Superhero: Loophole

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We Buy A Superhero: Loophole

We Buy A Superhero: Loophole

We Buy A Superhero: Loophole

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Planet Money ventures to another realm on their journey to acquire a superhero Siena Mae/NPR hide caption

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Siena Mae/NPR

Planet Money ventures to another realm on their journey to acquire a superhero

Siena Mae/NPR

Well, this is awkward. In the first episode of this series, we said we would buy a superhero. We failed. Marvel has not shown any interest in our offer. Superheroes never go on the market. We worried it might be time to hang up the ol' cape and tights before we even had a chance to fly.

But there is still a way. A way to find the superhero we need to build our comic book empire. We must venture into another realm, one where thousands of superheroes are suspended in time and space. That realm: the Public Domain. With enough time — and a little luck — we will find the face of Planet Money Studios.

Music: "Last Man Standing," "A Hero Rises," "Heroes Legacy," and "Dream the Dream."

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