How 'Defunding Police' Is Playing Out In Austin, Texas : Consider This from NPR Last summer, the city of Austin, Texas, slashed the budget for its police department. More recently, the city council voted on a new way to spend some of that money. KUT reporter Audrey McGlinchy explains what other changes have taken place in Austin.

A powerful new player is joining calls for reparations for Black Americans: the American Civil Liberties Union. Civil rights attorney Deborah Archer — the ACLU's newly elected board president and the first Black person to assume that role — explains the organization's new stance.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
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Update On A Movement: How 'Defunding Police' Is Playing Out In Austin, Texas

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Update On A Movement: How 'Defunding Police' Is Playing Out In Austin, Texas

Update On A Movement: How 'Defunding Police' Is Playing Out In Austin, Texas

Update On A Movement: How 'Defunding Police' Is Playing Out In Austin, Texas

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/970107572/970298430" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A protester carries a sign that reads "Defund The Police" during the Black Women Matter "Say Her Name" march last July in Richmond, Va. Eze Amos/Getty Images hide caption

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Eze Amos/Getty Images

A protester carries a sign that reads "Defund The Police" during the Black Women Matter "Say Her Name" march last July in Richmond, Va.

Eze Amos/Getty Images

Last summer, the city of Austin, Texas, slashed the budget for its police department. More recently, the city council voted on a new way to spend some of that money. KUT reporter Audrey McGlinchy explains what other changes have taken place in Austin.

A powerful new player is joining calls for reparations for Black Americans: the American Civil Liberties Union. Civil rights attorney Deborah Archer — the ACLU's newly elected board president and the first Black person to assume that role — explains the organization's new stance.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Lee Hale, Brianna Scott and Brent Baughman. It was edited by Sami Yenigun with help from Wynne Davis. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.