James West On Invention And Inclusion In STEM : Short Wave James West has been a curious tinkerer since he was a child, always wondering how things worked. Throughout his long career in STEM, he's also been an advocate for diversity and inclusion — from co-founding the Association for Black Laboratory Employees in 1970 to his work today with The Ingenuity Project, a non-profit that cultivates math and science skills in middle and high school students in Baltimore public schools.

Host Maddie Sofia talks to him about his life, career, and about how a device he helped invent in the 60's made their interview possible.

Email us at shortwave@npr.org.
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James West On Invention And Inclusion In Science

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James West On Invention And Inclusion In Science

James West On Invention And Inclusion In Science

James West On Invention And Inclusion In Science

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Throughout his long career in STEM, James West has been an advocate for diversity and inclusion. Will Kirk/Johns Hopkins University hide caption

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Will Kirk/Johns Hopkins University

Throughout his long career in STEM, James West has been an advocate for diversity and inclusion.

Will Kirk/Johns Hopkins University

James West has been a curious tinkerer since he was a child, always wondering how things worked. Throughout his long career in STEM, he's also been an advocate for diversity and inclusion — from co-founding the Association for Black Laboratory Employees in 1970 to his work today with The Ingenuity Project, a non-profit that cultivates math and science skills in middle and high school students in Baltimore public schools.

Host Maddie Sofia talks to him about his life, career, and about how a device he helped invent in the 60's made their interview possible.

Email us at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Berly McCoy and Brit Hanson, fact-checked by Rasha Aridi and edited by Viet Le. Patrick Murray provided engineering support.