Black History Month Playlist February is Black History Month — a time to remember more than 400 years of Black heritage. To celebrate the achievements of the community, we created a playlist of our favorite conversations.

Black History Month Playlist

RyanJLane/RyanJLane / iStock
A montage blend of African American faces close up, both men and women with different shades and colors in skin tone. Melanin beauty.
RyanJLane/RyanJLane / iStock

About the Playlist

February is Black History Month — a time to remember more than 400 years of Black heritage. To celebrate the achievements of the community, we created a playlist of our favorite conversations.

Featured Speakers

LaToya Ruby Frazier: What Is The Human Cost Of Toxic Water And Environmental Racism?

Flint, Michigan is the site of one of the worst ongoing water crises in recent U.S. history. Artist LaToya Ruby Frazier has spent years capturing the stories of life living with toxic water. A version of this segment was originally heard in the episode Water.

Colette Pichon Battle: How Can We Prepare For The Next Hurricane Katrina?

Sea level rise will displace millions by 2100 — and the Louisiana bayous, where Colette Pichon Battle lives, may disappear entirely. She describes how we can avert the worst when disaster strikes. A version of this segment was originally heard in the episode Water.

Stacey Abrams: How Can Your Response to a Setback Influence Your Future?

Stacey Abrams' journey in politics has taught her a lot about life. Her greatest lessons, she says, have come from the setbacks she has experienced along the way. A version of this segment was originally heard in the episode School of Life.

Alvin Irby: How Can We Inspire Children To Be Lifelong Readers?

Even though kids learn to read in school, many hate it. Educator Alvin Irby shares insights on inspiring children—especially Black boys—to discover books they enjoy and begin identifying as readers. A version of this segment was originally heard in the episode School of Life.

Ebony Roberts and Shaka Senghor: After Separating, How Do You Co-Parent As A Team?

After nine years and the birth of their son, Ebony Roberts and Shaka Senghor ultimately separated. But they made a vow: despite the conflict that led to their split, they'd still co-parent as a team. A version of this segment was originally heard in the episode Finding Another Way.

Elizabeth White: How Have This Century's Financial Crises Affected Older Adults?

At age 55, Elizabeth White lost her job--and her entire safety net--in the 2008 recession. Her story isn't uncommon. White says, now more older adults are pushed out of their jobs and into poverty. A version of this segment was originally heard in the episode A Century Of Money.

Baratunde Thurston: How To Citizen

This year's election saw historic voter turnout. But in a divided democracy, how else can we commit to our civic duties? This hour, Baratunde Thurston joins Manoush with ideas on how to citizen. A version of this segment was originally heard in the episode How To Citizen.

Brent Leggs: How Can Seeing Black History As American History Begin To Make Amends?

How can we make amends for the atrocities of slavery and segregation? Historian and preservationist Brent Leggs discusses one step in confronting the past: preserving African American historic sites. A version of this segment was originally heard in the episode Making Amends.

Joy Buolamwini: How Do Biased Algorithms Damage Marginalized Communities?

Data, numbers, algorithms are supposed to be neutral ... right? Computer scientist Joy Buolamwini discusses the way biased algorithms can lead to real-world inequality. A version of this segment was originally heard in the episode Warped Reality.

Danielle Allen: How Can Democratic Values Guide Us When Facing A Global Crisis?

In a democracy, what does the path through a pandemic look like? Political theorist Danielle Allen says the solution require us to preserve individual lives, individual rights, and equality. A version of this segment was originally heard in the June episode The Greater Good?.

Clint Smith: To Protest And To Reckon With Racism In America

The killing of George Floyd by a police officer sparked massive protests nationwide. Writer, teacher, and scholar Clint Smith reflects on that moment through conversation, letters, and poetry. A version of this segment was originally heard in the June episode Clint Smith.

Michael Tubbs: What Does It Take To Transform A Struggling City?

Michael Tubbs has been saying "reinvent Stockton" since he ran for city council. Having grown up in Stockton himself, Tubbs takes a community-oriented approach to creating positive change in the city. A version of this segment was originally heard in the episode Reinvention.

Jacqueline Woodson: What Is The Hidden Power Of Slow Reading?

Novelist Jacqueline Woodson is a slow reader. Taking her time lets her savor each word, brings her closer to each story, and it lets her pay respect to her ancestors who weren't allowed to read. A version of this segment was originally heard in the episode Teaching For Better Humans.