Users Report 'Drunken' Roombas After Software Update The convenient robotic vacuums got a software update, and now users are saying the device is hitting furniture and struggling to find charging stations.
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Users Report 'Drunken' Roombas After Software Update

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Users Report 'Drunken' Roombas After Software Update

Users Report 'Drunken' Roombas After Software Update

Users Report 'Drunken' Roombas After Software Update

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/971681198/971681199" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The convenient robotic vacuums got a software update, and now users are saying the device is hitting furniture and struggling to find charging stations.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Are you wandering the house aimlessly feeling like you're going in circles, barely even functioning? Well, you might be burned out, or you might be a Roomba. The robotic vacuums got a software update, and Roomba owners say the machines seem drunk. They're hitting furniture and struggling to find their charging stations. The Verge reports it could take weeks to fix. Until then, give your vacuum some time off. We all need it. Happy Friday. It's MORNING EDITION.

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