Waylon Payne Considers His Experiences With Familial Fame, Addiction On 'Blue Eyes' : World Cafe : World Cafe Words and Music from WXPN In this session, Payne perform songs from his record Blue Eyes, The Harlot, The Queer, The Pusher and Me – songs that touch on his famous parents, his struggles with addiction and journey to sobriety.
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Waylon Payne on World Cafe

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Waylon Payne Considers His Experiences With Familial Fame, Addiction On 'Blue Eyes'

Waylon Payne Considers His Experiences With Familial Fame, Addiction On 'Blue Eyes'

Waylon Payne on World Cafe

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/972511898/972521269" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Set List

  • "Dangerous Criminal"
  • "Old Blue Eyes"
  • "Santa Ana Winds"

It seems almost inevitable that Waylon Payne – the son of country singer Sammi Smith, who had a hit in the early '70s with "Help Me Make It Through the Night," and Jody Payne, a longtime guitarist for Willie Nelson – would end up making music. But growing up with two famed-musician parents also came with its own challenges. On his new album, Blue Eyes, The Harlot, The Queer, The Pusher and Me, Waylon draws directly from those experiences, his struggles with addiction and his journey to sobriety.

The first song we hear in this session is the album cut of the song "Sins of the Father," a track that gives a bird's-eye overview of Waylon's story. In it, he sings about his dad, but first begins with a recording of the voice of his best friend's son Lake, who helped inspire Waylon to deal with his addiction.

Episode Playlist