Covid Economic Reset Due to Technology and New Businesses : The Indicator from Planet Money Is an economic reset on the way? Economist Constance Hunter explains how technology and businesses have changed during Covid, and how these trends offer some hope for long-term recovery.

The Covid Reset: A Chat With Constance Hunter

The Covid Reset: A Chat With Constance Hunter

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/977874379/977990693" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Erin Scott/Getty Images
(Photo by Erin Scott-Pool/Getty Images)
Erin Scott/Getty Images

The U.S. economy has had to quickly adapt to the economic and public health conditions of the pandemic. Businesses and workers have had to radically change how they operate, embracing new technologies to remain safe while still getting things done. Consumers have also changed the way they shop. And the U.S. government is spending a historically massive amount of money to fight the recession: about 5 trillion dollars.

We've been wondering whether these adaptations aren't just going to help people get through the pandemic now, but might also have big effects on the economy in the years after the pandemic ends. Constance Hunter, the chief economist at KPMG, recently gave a speech on this very subject at the National Association for Business Economics conference. And so on The Indicator, we ask Constance all about the ways in which these adaptations, forced on us by tragic and terrible circumstances, might contain a silver lining for the economic future.

Here is a link to the transcript of Constance's speech reprinted in Business Economics.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: Twitter / Facebook / Newsletter.

Subscribe to our show on Apple Podcasts, PocketCasts and NPR One.