Evanston's Housing-Based Reparations Program : Consider This from NPR The city of Evanston, Ill., authorized spending on a reparation program this week — believed to be the first of its kind in the country. Here's the report on Evanston's racial history we mention in this episode.

Alderwoman Cecily Fleming — an African American resident of Evanston — tells NPR why she voted against the plan.

And Dreisen Heath, researcher at the Human Rights Watch, argues that reparations can take many forms.

In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
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First-In-The-Nation Effort Advances Debate Over What Form Reparations Should Take

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First-In-The-Nation Effort Advances Debate Over What Form Reparations Should Take

First-In-The-Nation Effort Advances Debate Over What Form Reparations Should Take

First-In-The-Nation Effort Advances Debate Over What Form Reparations Should Take

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/979254225/981745359" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Evanston, Ill., just north of Chicago, is believed to be the first place in the United States to provide reparations to Black residents after its City Council on Monday approved a plan to address racial discrimination in housing. Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP via Getty Images

Evanston, Ill., just north of Chicago, is believed to be the first place in the United States to provide reparations to Black residents after its City Council on Monday approved a plan to address racial discrimination in housing.

Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP via Getty Images

The city of Evanston, Ill., authorized spending on a reparation program this week — believed to be the first of its kind in the country. Here's the report on Evanston's racial history we mention in this episode.

Alderwoman Cecily Fleming — an African American resident of Evanston — tells NPR why she voted against the plan.

And Dreisen Heath, researcher at the Human Rights Watch, argues that reparations can take many forms.

In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brent Baughman, Ayen Bior, Jason Fuller, and Brianna Scott. It was edited by Sami Yenigun with help from and Wynne Davis. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.