When Is Racial Harassment Considered A Hate Crime? : 1A The shooter in the deadly attack at three Atlanta spas, in which six Asian women were among the eight people killed, is charged with murder. But the shooting isn't currently being prosecuted as a hate crime, despite a wave of attacks on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders over the last year

What makes a hate crime? And why don't we see them prosecuted more often?

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When Is Racial Harassment Considered A Hate Crime?

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When Is Racial Harassment Considered A Hate Crime?

1A

When Is Racial Harassment Considered A Hate Crime?

When Is Racial Harassment Considered A Hate Crime?

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A protester holds a sign during a rally in solidarity with Asian hate crime victims outside of the San Francisco Hall of Justice in San Francisco, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A protester holds a sign during a rally in solidarity with Asian hate crime victims outside of the San Francisco Hall of Justice in San Francisco, California.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The shooter in the deadly attacks at three Atlanta spas, in which six Asian women were among the eight people killed, is being charged with murder. But the attacks aren't currently being prosecuted as hate crimes.

This is despite a wave of attacks on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders over the last year, which is a part of a larger trend of racism and bigotry that members of the AAPI community say has always been a part of American society.

So, was it a hate crime? What qualifies as a hate crime? And why don't we see them prosecuted more often?

Allison Padilla-Goodman and former federal prosecutor Shanlon Wu joined us for the discussion.

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