Actor John Cleese Wants A Piece Of The Non Fungible Token Action An NFT is a digital image with one copy. An unnamed artist, who's actor John Cleese, is auctioning his iPad line drawing that resembles the Brooklyn Bridge. He wants more than $69 million for it.
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Actor John Cleese Wants A Piece Of The Non Fungible Token Action

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Actor John Cleese Wants A Piece Of The Non Fungible Token Action

Actor John Cleese Wants A Piece Of The Non Fungible Token Action

Actor John Cleese Wants A Piece Of The Non Fungible Token Action

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/981088566/981088567" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An NFT is a digital image with one copy. An unnamed artist, who's actor John Cleese, is auctioning his iPad line drawing that resembles the Brooklyn Bridge. He wants more than $69 million for it.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. People on the Internet are paying big money for NFTs - non-fungible tokens, a digital image with only one copy. People are paying so much, this unnamed artist is making a sale.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JOHN CLEESE: Today, I've got a bridge to sell you.

INSKEEP: He's auctioning his iPad line drawing that sort of resembles the Brooklyn Bridge. Bidding is over $35,000. But the unnamed artist, actually John Cleese, wants $69 million. It's MORNING EDITION.

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