Lightning Rocks And Life : Short Wave When lightning strikes the ground, it can leave behind a root-like rock called a fulgurite. Host Maddie Sofia talks with NPR science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce about what lightning and its funky rock creation can reveal about the origins of life.

To read more of the story, check out Nell's reporting here.

You can email us at ShortWave@npr.org.
NPR logo

Fulgurite: What A Lightning-Formed Rock May Have Contributed To Life On Earth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/981180923/982783330" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Fulgurite: What A Lightning-Formed Rock May Have Contributed To Life On Earth

Fulgurite: What A Lightning-Formed Rock May Have Contributed To Life On Earth

Fulgurite: What A Lightning-Formed Rock May Have Contributed To Life On Earth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/981180923/982783330" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lightning strikes on August 5, 2005 southwest of Barstow, California David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David McNew/Getty Images

Lightning strikes on August 5, 2005 southwest of Barstow, California

David McNew/Getty Images

When lightning strikes the ground, it can leave behind a root-like rock called a fulgurite. Host Maddie Sofia talks with NPR science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce about what lightning and its funky rock creation can reveal about the origins of life.

To read more of the story, check out Nell's reporting here.

You can email us at ShortWave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Thomas Lu, edited by Viet Le and Gisele Grayson, and fact-checked by Rasha Aridi. The audio engineer for this episode was Gilly Moon.