The Racial Reckoning in Dermatology : Short Wave Many skin conditions, from rashes to Lyme disease to various cancers, present differently on dark skin. Yet medical literature and textbooks don't often include those images, pointing to a bigger problem in dermatology. Today on the show, we take a close look at how the science of skincare has evolved to better serve patients of color, but still has a long way to go.
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Meet The Dermatologists Advancing Better Care For Skin Of Color

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Meet The Dermatologists Advancing Better Care For Skin Of Color

Meet The Dermatologists Advancing Better Care For Skin Of Color

Meet The Dermatologists Advancing Better Care For Skin Of Color

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/983051020/983248641" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dermatologist Dr. Jenna Lester treats her patient Geoffry Blair Hutto in the UCSF Primary Care clinic. Barbara Ries hide caption

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Barbara Ries

Dermatologist Dr. Jenna Lester treats her patient Geoffry Blair Hutto in the UCSF Primary Care clinic.

Barbara Ries

Many skin conditions, from rashes to Lyme disease to various cancers, manifest differently on dark skin. Yet medical literature and textbooks have historically underrepresented pictures of skin of color, leaving critical diagnostic information off the page.

"Historically, Black skin, brown skin is not represented in our literature appropriately," said Dr. Ginette Okoye, Chair of Dermatology at Howard University School of Medicine.

In dermatology, skin of color has not been represented in a field that purports to care for the skin of all.

Today on the show, reporter Emily Kwong and host Maddie Sofia take a close look at dermatology — how the science of skincare has evolved to better serve patients of color, but still has a long way to go.

We speak with:

Dermatology literature mentioned in this episode:

You can email us at ShortWave@npr.org.

Today’s episode was produced by Thomas Lu, edited by Viet Le, and fact checked by Rasha Aridi. Special thanks to Marcia Davis.