Virtual Reality Office Work Rising Due to Covid Pandemic : The Indicator from Planet Money The Indicator team has been working remotely for about a year now. While remote work has its perks, sometimes we miss sharing an office space. Can virtual reality help bridge the gap?
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The Virtual Office

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The Virtual Office

The Virtual Office

The Virtual Office

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/983097569/983244378" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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DEBORAH BLOOM/AFP via Getty Images
(Photo by DEBORAH BLOOM/AFP via Getty Images)
DEBORAH BLOOM/AFP via Getty Images

It's been more than a year since we at the Indicator started working from home. It definitely has its perks, like pajamas all day and mid-day naps, but also, it's not the same. We used to bounce ideas off each other all the time, and shows would get smarter in this amazing, organic way... synergy!

We miss the synergy. Staring at a bunch of little squares on Zoom isn't the same. So, recently, we decided to meet up together, in an actual meeting room, just not in the physical world. We met up in virtual reality. Virtual reality is a pretty new thing, but the pandemic has supercharged interest and investment in virtual reality. The American virtual reality market is now worth nearly 16 billion dollars, and that's expected to almost double in the next five years.

On the Indicator, we test out this emerging technology: is virtual reality really the future of office work?

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