'We Are Each Other's Harvest:' The Past, Present And Future Of Black Farmers : 1A We talk about the history of Black farmers in the United States, the impact of the American Rescue Act and what it means to reclaim the land.

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'We Are Each Other's Harvest:' The Past, Present And Future Of Black Farmers

'We Are Each Other's Harvest:' The Past, Present And Future Of Black Farmers

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Naima (L) and Leah (R) Penniman work on Soul Fire Farm, a community farm in New York. Harper Collins / Alison Gootee hide caption

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Harper Collins / Alison Gootee

Naima (L) and Leah (R) Penniman work on Soul Fire Farm, a community farm in New York.

Harper Collins / Alison Gootee

Over the past century, Black farmers have lost 90 percent of their land. The 5 billion dollars they're receiving via the stimulus package aims to not only stymie the harm done by the coronavirus pandemic, but also to recognize decades of mistreatment and discrimination by the Department of Agriculture.

According to the USDA, 1.3 percent of the country's millions of farmers are Black. Throughout the country, their stories are little known.

Naima Penniman of Soul Fire Farm and author Natalie Baszile talk with us about the history of Black farmers in the United States, the potential impact of the American Rescue Act and what it means to reclaim the land.

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