7-Year-Old Girl Tells Old Navy That She Needs Jeans With Real Pockets Kamryn Garnder's letter to the retailer explained that she needs a place to put her hands and her stuff. Old Navy replied with a hand written note of appreciation and four pairs of pants with pockets.
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7-Year-Old Girl Tells Old Navy That She Needs Jeans With Real Pockets

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7-Year-Old Girl Tells Old Navy That She Needs Jeans With Real Pockets

7-Year-Old Girl Tells Old Navy That She Needs Jeans With Real Pockets

7-Year-Old Girl Tells Old Navy That She Needs Jeans With Real Pockets

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/984952744/984952745" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Kamryn Garnder's letter to the retailer explained that she needs a place to put her hands and her stuff. Old Navy replied with a hand written note of appreciation and four pairs of pants with pockets.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Some jeans that are marketed to girls don't have legit front pockets. They're either sewn closed or they're too small. Seven-year-old Kamryn Gardner was super annoyed by this, so she wrote a letter to Old Navy politely suggesting that the jeans with fake pockets aren't that helpful. Kamryn wrote that she needs a place to put her hands and her stuff. Of course, she does. The retailer replied with a note of appreciation and four pairs of pants with actual pockets. It's MORNING EDITION.

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