History Of Corporate Boycotts, Plus Historical Strategies Of Anti-Trans Bills : It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders Corporations have spoken out against the new restrictive voting law in Georgia, but to what end? Sam talks to Slate writer Dahlia Lithwick about whether that tactic actually effects change—and whether it's just a performance. Plus, Sam talks to author and historian Jules Gill-Peterson about the historic flood of anti-trans bills in state legislatures and how these bills echo anti-gay rhetoric of the past. Then, friends of the show Saeed Jones and Zach Stafford join Sam to play Who Said That.

— Read Dahlia Lithwick's Slate article, "The Problem with Boycotting Georgia"

You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.
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What's The Strategy? Corporate Activism And Anti-Trans Bills

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What's The Strategy? Corporate Activism And Anti-Trans Bills

What's The Strategy? Corporate Activism And Anti-Trans Bills

What's The Strategy? Corporate Activism And Anti-Trans Bills

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/985353453/985928827" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

African Methodist Episcopal Church Bishop Reginald Jackson announces a boycott of Coca-Cola Co. products outside the Georgia Capitol n Atlanta. Jackson says Coca-Cola and other large Georgia companies haven't done enough to oppose restrictive voting bills that Georgia lawmakers were debating as Jackson spoke. Jeff Amy/AP hide caption

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Jeff Amy/AP

African Methodist Episcopal Church Bishop Reginald Jackson announces a boycott of Coca-Cola Co. products outside the Georgia Capitol n Atlanta. Jackson says Coca-Cola and other large Georgia companies haven't done enough to oppose restrictive voting bills that Georgia lawmakers were debating as Jackson spoke.

Jeff Amy/AP

Corporations have spoken out against the new restrictive voting law in Georgia, but to what end? Sam talks to Dahlia Lithwick, who writes about the courts and the law for Slate and hosts the legal podcast Amicus, and whose recent article "The Problem with Boycotting Georgia" gives a bigger picture view of corporate activism. They discuss whether that tactic actually effects change—and whether it's just a performance.

Also, Sam talks to author and historian Jules Gill-Peterson about the historic flood of anti-trans bills in state legislatures and how these bills echo anti-gay rhetoric of the past.

Then, friends of the show Saeed Jones and Zach Stafford join Sam to play Who Said That.

This episode of 'It's Been a Minute' was produced by Jinae West, Andrea Gutierrez and Sylvie Douglis. Our intern is Liam McBain. Our editor is Jordana Hochman. Our director of programming is Steve Nelson. You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.