The workplace hasn't gotten much better for women since the movie "9 to 5" : Planet Money The movie "9 to 5" used humor to highlight the struggles of women in the workplace 40 years ago. Where are we now? | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Workin' 9 To 5

Workin' 9 To 5

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Dolly Parton, Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda in a scene from the movie "9 to 5" Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Dolly Parton, Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda in a scene from the movie "9 to 5"

Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Flexible hours for working parents, daycare centers at the office, equal pay. Between the 1960s and 1980s, there was a real sense that big workplace changes were just beyond the horizon.

At the time a very common job for women was clerical work. And in 1973, a group of secretaries in Boston formed a women's labor organization. They called themselves the "9to5."

Actress Jane Fonda then decided to turn the real life struggles of working women into a hit Hollywood movie. Starring Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, and country singer Dolly Parton (who also wrote the famous theme song), 9 to 5 was one of the first movies focused on the lives of women in the workplace.

Today on the show, we meet the women behind the movement that inspired the movie. And a look at how far we have — or haven't — come since then.

Music: "9 to 5," "5 to 9," and "Fly on the Wall."

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