The Lumineers' Jeremiah Fraites Made A Record That Sounds Nothing Like The Lumineers : World Cafe : World Cafe Words and Music from WXPN The co-founder of one of the biggest bands on the planet steps out to make an ... instrumental piano record.
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Jeremiah Fraites on World Cafe

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The Lumineers' Jeremiah Fraites Made A Record That Sounds Nothing Like The Lumineers

The Lumineers' Jeremiah Fraites Made A Record That Sounds Nothing Like The Lumineers

Jeremiah Fraites on World Cafe

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Jeremiah Fraites Roberto Graziano Moro/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Roberto Graziano Moro/Courtesy of the artist

Jeremiah Fraites

Roberto Graziano Moro/Courtesy of the artist

Set List

  • "Possessed"
  • "Tokyo"
  • "An Air that Kills"

Ah, the tried-and-true debut solo album. A chance for an integral member of a band to step out, free from the constraints of a group dynamic, to exert total creative control on what comes out of the speakers and showcase musical ideas. Jeremiah Fraites, co-founder of The Lumineers, one of the biggest bands on the planet, made something that sounds nothing like The Lumineers: an instrumental piano record.

Piano, Piano is over a decade in the making, and showcases Fraites' ability to write a song without lyrics or vocals. It's a beautiful debut, crafted with multiple pianos, including one named Firewood, which Fraites saved from certain doom. We'll talk about the inspiration for the album, and he shares beautiful live recordings, starting with "Possessed."

Episode Playlist