Accent Reduction And How To Speak Global English : Rough Translation Heather Hansen used to teach people to speak "perfect" English. Until she realized that so-called "bad English" might be a better way to communicate.

How To Speak Bad English

How To Speak Bad English

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Global communication specialist Heather Hansen has a stock of English language books that no longer fit her approach to teaching. Heather Hansen hide caption

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Heather Hansen

Global communication specialist Heather Hansen has a stock of English language books that no longer fit her approach to teaching.

Heather Hansen

English is the most widely spoken language in the world, and the vast majority of English speakers learned the language in a classroom. Yet in conference rooms and language courses around the world, they are often told they speak "bad English." Global communication consultant Heather Hansen tells why "bad English" — with its simplified vocabulary, fueled by the contributions of non-native speakers around the world — might be more universally understandable.

In this episode of Rough Translation, we set out to discover: why might "bad English" be the best way to communicate? To find out, we'll hear insights and anecdotes from English speakers from around the world, who talk about their frustrations and joys over a language they've made their own. We'll talk to Hansen about why "bad English" is good for business, and how native speakers can communicate better by changing how they think about language.

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