Property Owner Calls Police After Couple Tries To Get Married There The couple's wedding invitation asked attendees to come to the Florida estate for the festivities. The 16,300-square-foot mansion, however, belongs to Nathan Finkel, and he doesn't do weddings.
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Property Owner Calls Police After Couple Tries To Get Married There

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Property Owner Calls Police After Couple Tries To Get Married There

Property Owner Calls Police After Couple Tries To Get Married There

Property Owner Calls Police After Couple Tries To Get Married There

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/989728196/989728197" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The couple's wedding invitation asked attendees to come to the Florida estate for the festivities. The 16,300-square-foot mansion, however, belongs to Nathan Finkel, and he doesn't do weddings.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. A Florida couple found the perfect spot for their wedding - a 16,000-square-foot estate featuring a pool with a waterfall. Courtney Wilson and Shenita Jones invited people to come to the Wilson estate. Sadly, the property belongs to Nathan Finkel, who doesn't do weddings. The couple told Mr. Finkel it was God's message they should marry at his house. But Finkel sent his own message to police, who had the wedding party leave. It's MORNING EDITION.

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