Food And Plants: Conversations About How We Cope : 1A How do food and plants help us make sense of the world?

Musician Michelle Zauner talks about her latest project, — a memoir, Crying In H Mart — that tells the story of her mother's death. In it, Zauner writes about using the food they made to remember her mom.

And Beronda L. Montgomery, a biochemistry professor at Michigan State University, has a lot to say about how plants experience the world in her new book Lessons from Plants.

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Food And Plants: Conversations About How We Cope

Food And Plants: Conversations About How We Cope

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Leiister Soon poses while holding an alocasia silver dragon plant in his home in Kuala Lumpur. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Leiister Soon poses while holding an alocasia silver dragon plant in his home in Kuala Lumpur.

AFP via Getty Images

Food plays an important role in how we connect with our friends and family, our heritage and the world around us.

Michelle Zauner is someone who knows that. Many know her better as the indie musician Japanese Breakfast.

But she has a new project—a memoir, called Crying In H Mart—that tells the story of her mother's passing. In it, Zauner spends time thinking about how to remember her mother, especially as it relates to the food they ate and their Korean heritage. It's based on an essay she wrote for The New Yorker.

Meanwhile, plants can also be therapeutic.

It's no surprise people have tried to find ways to make their spaces in the pandemic as pleasant as possible. For many, that's meant the purchase of indoor potted plants, among other things.

And while they certainly can do a lot for indoor decor, a new book argues they also have a lot to teach us as well.

Beronda L. Montgomery is a biochemistry professor at Michigan State University and she has a lot to say about how plants experience the world in her new book Lessons from Plants.

What can our leafy green friends teach us?

We spoke to Zauner and Montgomery during the conversation.

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