Town Crier Championships In Britain Keep Tradition Alive Because of the pandemic, people most submit their cries by mail. The Guardian reports each 140-word, written proclamation will be judged by staying on topic, and ending with "God Save the Queen."
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Town Crier Championships In Britain Keep Tradition Alive

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Town Crier Championships In Britain Keep Tradition Alive

Town Crier Championships In Britain Keep Tradition Alive

Town Crier Championships In Britain Keep Tradition Alive

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Because of the pandemic, people most submit their cries by mail. The Guardian reports each 140-word, written proclamation will be judged by staying on topic, and ending with "God Save the Queen."

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. Before radio or TV, town criers were the newscasters of Britain. Town crier championships keep that tradition alive. People gather and show off their voices. But not this year because the pandemic is still on, so people are submitting cries by mail. The Guardian reports each written proclamation will be judged by staying on topic and ending with God save the queen. Sadly, our submission ends by saying, it's MORNING EDITION.

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