India's COVID Crisis, Plus 'Invisibilia' : It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders Even as vaccine access expands in the the US, the pandemic is far from over globally. Sam talks to Aarti Singh, a resident of New Delhi, about what it's been like living there as India's COVID-19 cases skyrocket. Then, Sam talks to public health activist Achal Prabhala about why rich and poor countries have unequal access to vaccines. Plus, Sam chats with Invisibilia host Kia Miakka Natisse about the new season of the show and her episode on how a reparations effort in Vermont shed light on how people talk about money and racial justice.

You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.
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India And The Unequal Distribution Of Vaccines; Plus, 'Invisibilia' Returns

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India And The Unequal Distribution Of Vaccines; Plus, 'Invisibilia' Returns

India And The Unequal Distribution Of Vaccines; Plus, 'Invisibilia' Returns

India And The Unequal Distribution Of Vaccines; Plus, 'Invisibilia' Returns

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/992039371/992600729" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People wait to receive COVID-19 vaccine in Mumbai, India, Thursday, April 29, 2021. India set another global record in new virus cases Thursday. Rajanish Kakade/AP hide caption

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Rajanish Kakade/AP

People wait to receive COVID-19 vaccine in Mumbai, India, Thursday, April 29, 2021. India set another global record in new virus cases Thursday.

Rajanish Kakade/AP

Even as vaccine access expands throughout the US, the pandemic is far from over globally. Sam talks to Aarti Singh, a resident of New Delhi, about what it's been like living there as India's COVID-19 cases skyrocket. Then, Sam talks to public health activist Achal Prabhala about why rich and poor countries have unequal access to vaccines.

Plus, Sam chats with Invisibilia host Kia Miakka Natisse about the new season of the show and her episode on how a reparations effort in Vermont shed light on how people talk about money and racial justice. Invisibilia producer Abby Wendle joins them to play Who Said That.

This episode of 'It's Been a Minute' was produced by Jinae West, Andrea Gutierrez, Sylvie Douglis, Christina Cala and Liam McBain. Our editor is Jordana Hochman. Our director of programming is Steve Nelson. You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.