Predictions After the new mask rules, our panelists predict what the CDC will decree next.
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Predictions

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Predictions

Predictions

Predictions

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After the new mask rules, our panelists predict what the CDC will decree next.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, what will the CDC advise us to do next? Helen Hong.

HELEN HONG: Call your mother. Oh, wait. Never mind. That's just my mother pretending to be Dr. Fauci again.

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SAGAL: Adam Felber.

ADAM FELBER: Now that they've learned that they can get us to do just about anything, it's going to be the CDC National Pull My Finger Initiative.

SAGAL: And Laci Mosley.

LACI MOSLEY: The CDC will advise that we all start watching "Dr. Phil" and "90 Day Fiance" so we can reacclimate to our normal level of poor mental health and toxic dating habits.

BILL KURTIS: (Laughter) Well, if any of that happens, panel, we'll ask you about it on WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME.

SAGAL: Thank you so much, Bill Kurtis. Thanks also to Helen Hong, Adam Felber and Laci Mosley.

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SAGAL: Thanks to all of you for listening. We're going to see you outside - and we know we will - real soon. I'm Peter Sagal, and we'll see you next week.

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SAGAL: This is NPR.

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