Google Union Workers Fight for a Say in Company Culture : The Indicator from Planet Money A new union was formed earlier this year. Why has it caught our attention? Some of its members make more than $300,000 a year, and they all work at Alphabet, Google's parent company.
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A 21st Century Union

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A 21st Century Union

A 21st Century Union

A 21st Century Union

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
(Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Union membership is on the decline, and it has been for a while. Back in the 80s, one in five workers was represented by a union. Today, it's just one in ten. And yet, there is one place where union organizing is growing, a place where many employees make over $300,000 a year: Google.

If you're thinking, "why would Google workers want a union?", you're probably not alone, because some of the perks at this company are really out there. At Google, lunchtime is beyond your wildest dreams. Google workers have been served things like lobster, gourmet monkfish, and slow-cooked duck. It's a place with onsite haircuts and laundry, a place that's literally had Lady Gaga on campus.

But Google's new union isn't focused on negotiating benefits. On The Indicator, we consider a different kind of union, led by white collar workers who aren't just thinking about money, but what companies can do with the stuff these workers produce and whether they should have a say. Welcome to the 21st century union.

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