Mugshots: They're Not Exactly The Gold Standard In Portraiture An example is the Ohio man who was particularly miffed about his police photo circulating online. He snapped a selfie and sent it to police. Saying, "Here is a better photo — that one is terrible."

Mugshots: They're Not Exactly The Gold Standard In Portraiture

Mugshots: They're Not Exactly The Gold Standard In Portraiture

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An example is the Ohio man who was particularly miffed about his police photo circulating online. He snapped a selfie and sent it to police. Saying, "Here is a better photo — that one is terrible."

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Mugshots - they're not exactly the gold standard in portraiture. Even though they capture every side, they really don't capture your best side, do they? One man on the lam in Ohio was particularly miffed about his police photo circulating online, so he snapped a selfie and sent it to the Lima, Ohio, PD, saying, here's a better photo. That one is terrible. He was picked up a few days later in Florida. No word on if the lighting was any better this time around. It's MORNING EDITION.

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