In The Pandemic, Children Face A Mental Health Crisis : Short Wave According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the proportion of emergency department visits by children in mental health crises went up significantly during the pandemic — about 30% for kids ages 12-17 and 24% for children ages 5-11 between March and October of last year, compared to 2019. For psychiatrists like Dr. Nicole Christian-Brathwaite, this is evident in her practice and personal life. We talk to her about how this past year has taken a toll on children and their mental health, as well as her advice for helping the kids in your life cope better.

In The Pandemic, Children Face A Mental Health Crisis

In The Pandemic, Children Face A Mental Health Crisis

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Shortly after schools in the U.S. began closing due to the pandemic, Dr. Christian-Brathwaite started seeing an increase in calls for psychiatric evaluations and support. Ridvan Celik/Getty Images hide caption

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Ridvan Celik/Getty Images

Shortly after schools in the U.S. began closing due to the pandemic, Dr. Christian-Brathwaite started seeing an increase in calls for psychiatric evaluations and support.

Ridvan Celik/Getty Images

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the proportion of emergency department visits by children in mental health crises went up significantly during the pandemic — about 30% for kids ages 12-17 and 24% for children ages 5-11 between March and October of last year, compared to 2019.

For psychiatrists like Dr. Nicole Christian-Brathwaite, this is evident in her practice and personal life. We talk to her about how this past year has taken a toll on children and their mental health, as well as her advice for helping the kids in your life cope better.

This episode was produced by Rebecca Ramirez, edited by Viet Le and fact-checked by Rasha Aridi. Josh Newell was the audio engineer.